Antiracism Book Group

First Meeting is Thursday, January 7, 2021

Me and White Supremacy by Layla F. Saad

Kick off 2021 with the #MeAndWhiteSupremacy 28 day challenge. Join St. John’s antiracism reading group this January for a month of journaling and weekly discussions. We will use Layla F. Saad’s book Me and White Supremacy to go through a step-by-step process to develop a better understanding of our white privilege and participation in white supremacy, so we can stop (often unconsciously) inflicting damage on Black, Indigenous and People of Color, and in turn, help other white people do better, too. It’s not to late to start reading and journaling. Join in weekly Zoom discussions: Link to cut and paste: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83419218446?pwd=WGdiWHBiYUxWc0wvUXNuUWpjL3NTdz09 (Meeting ID: 834 1921 8446 Passcode: 3857) each Thursday in January at 7:30 p.m. For more information or to RSVP email to Laura.t.singer@gmail.com. You can also  RSVP on Facebook.

Latinx Book Group

This group met from September 2019 – June 2020 and again in the fall of 2020. Please email the Parish Office if you are interested in joining when the group reconvenes.

So far we have read these books:

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomajor
I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez
Native Country of the Heart by Cherríe Moraga
Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado
The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
Wise Latinas: Writers on Higher Education edited by Jennifer De Leon
When I was Puerto Rican by Esmeralda Santiago

Art and Reflections on Race

Thursday, October 22 from 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. Art and Reflections on Race, an evening to share poetry and reflections on race will feature original poetry by young black poets as well as our own Rich Gage, and a conversation with Joshua Longbrake, artist of the “Confession” sculpture in the garden. The event will be one hour long via Zoom.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81162883439?pwd=WjJzU24xaUFXTjFZcExUNTBYR01NZz09

Meeting ID: 811 6288 3439
Passcode: 3857

By phone: 312.626.6799 ID: 811 6288 3439# Passcode: 3857#

500500

Guest Preacher Sunday, September 27

The Rev. Canon Robert Two Bulls

Click this link to hear his sermon.

The Rev. Canon Robert Two Bulls  (Oglala Lakota), Missioner for The Department of Indian Work and Multicultural Ministries for the Episcopal Church in Minnesota.

“I was born in Rapid City, SD and spent much of my first two decades of life off and on the Pine Ridge Reservation. I am an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota Oyate. My wife Ritchie is from Augusta, Georgia and her kin hail from both Virginia and NE Georgia. We were married in 1990 in Washington, D.C. She is an Art Therapist. We have two children. Our son Grant graduated from college a year ago and is a Circle of Beloved community member in north Minneapolis. Our daughter Reed currently resides with relatives in SD. Reed is an aspiring singer and painter. Over the past thirty years I have lived, studied and worked on both coasts (DC/NYC/LA) and now reside in the Minneapolis, MN. I was ordained the priesthood in January of 2001. The work I have done since the 80’s has been primarily within the Episcopal Church with emphasis on Indigenous communities. Many of my interests and hobbies relate to my identity as a visual artist. I have a deep interest in exploration of the intersection of Art and Spirituality. In the Spring of 2018 I spent my sabbatical at that intersection. I love to read on topics that range widely and I like to be informed. I write creatively, when the spirit moves me. Music is a great passion for me, leading me to begin learning, in recent years, how to play the electric guitar. I like being outdoors walking whether it be in the city or country. And I’m always up for a new adventure.”

Download the bulletin for Sunday, September 27.
Listen to the Prelude and Postlude.

Why change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Learn about the current movement to change the celebration of Columbus Day to a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Thank you to all who attended our conversation. We discussed this press release calling for the change.

Other suggested reading:
An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

This document will give you background and perspective from the American Indian Center.

Columbus and the Quest for Jerusalem: How Religion Drove the Voyages that Led to America by Carol Delaney

Learn a Native language!

A great back-to-school project for kids and teens (and it’s not all online!)

A Potawatomi Language lesson. Click to hear the first lesson.

Please help us honor the true native languages of this land by learning and sharing nature words of local Native American Chicagoans. Here’s how!

  1. Watch this short video about why language preservation is important: https://theways.org/story/living-language
  2. Visit the St. John’s garden (next to 3857 N Kostner Ave). Write down the words for the things you see that you want to learn the names of i.e. dirt, grass, rabbit, tree, robin, flower, worm etc.
  3. Choose a language you wish to learn. We recommend the starred * languages because you can look up the word and hear how it is pronounced. You may want to choose a language that is your own heritage or a neighbor’s. For instance, the Ho-Chunk nation has an office near St. John’s on Milwaukee Avenue. Here is a list of the 15 largest groups of Native American people living in the Chicagoland area:
LanguageLinkColor of ribbon
* Potawatomi  https://potawatomidictionary.com/Dictionarywhite
Odawa/Ottawahttps://dictionary.nishnaabemwin.atlas-ling.ca/#/help  dark yellow
Ho Chunkhttps://glosbe.com/en/win  light green
Menominee  http://www.menomineelanguage.com/dictionaries-word-listspink
Oneida  https://www.uwgb.edu/dictionary/EnglishToOneida.aspxlight brown
Blackfoot  https://dictionary.blackfoot.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpmedium blue
* Ojibwe  https://ojibwe.lib.umn.edu/browse/englishlight yellow
Cree  https://dictionary.plainscree.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpgrey
Lakota  https://lakhota.org/teach-lakota/classroom-materials/dictionary/red
Dakota  https://glosbe.com/en/daklight blue
Navajo  https://glosbe.com/en/nvtan
Choctaw  https://glosbe.com/en/cholight purple
Cherokee  https://www.manataka.org/page122.htmlorange
Choose your own!http://www.native-languages.org/
Slide to see ribbon color assignments
  1. Write the Native word you learned in permanent marker on the colored ribbon indicated. If the word is something that moves (like a rabbit), tie the ribbon to a picture of it (which you draw or photograph or print). If you are a St. John’s member there is roll of ribbon in your Sunday School in a bag. If you need ribbon please email parishoffice@stjohnschicago.com and we will deliver some to you!
  2. Go back to the garden and tie the ribbon to the thing (tree, flower, wood etc) and bring some sticks to tie on the ribbons and put in the ground (rabbit, butterfly, wind).
  3. Practice saying the words!

White Fragility Book Discussion

Thursday, August 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Join us to discuss the book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo, The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. 

Reading this Atlantic Monthly article that gives a critique of the book will help us discuss what Black authors are saying about this book by a White author. 

Here is a link to the reading guide:  https://www.beacon.org/assets/pdfs/whitefragilityreadingguide.pdf
Here are the questions we will discuss.

Join us on Thursday, August 20 at 7:30 pm via Zoom:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82264014704  Meeting ID: 822 6401 4704
By phone: 312.626.6799 Meeting ID: 998 6450 0270# 

Wrestling with White Supremacy

Book Discussion Thursday, July 30 at 7:30 p.m.

In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo offers a hard hitting but user friendly examination of race in America. She offers a contemporary take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement and more.

All are welcome to join!
We will host this event through Zoom.
You can RSVP to rector@stjohnschicago.com to get the zoom link.

A reading list from St. John’s Episcopal Church

  • Me and White Supremacy by Layla F. Saad
  • So You Want to Talk about Race by Ijeoma Oluo
  • Waking up White: and Finding Myself in the Story of Race by Debby Irving
  • White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin Diangelo
  • Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson
  • Birth of A White Nation by Jacqueline Battalora
  • Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God by Kelly Brown Douglas
  • Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
  • The 1619 Project published the New York Times