Worship with St. John’s: Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost, September 27

Photo by Brad Gehrig

8:00 and 10:00 a.m. online (details below)
9:00 a.m. Communion in the Garden. Please wear a mask.

Guest Preacher this Sunday, September 27 is The Rev. Canon Robert Two Bulls  (Oglala Lakota), Missioner for The Department of Indian Work and Multicultural Ministries for the Episcopal Church in Minnesota.

The Rev. Canon Robert Two Bulls

“I was born in Rapid City, SD and spent much of my first two decades of life off and on the Pine Ridge Reservation. I am an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota Oyate. My wife Ritchie is from Augusta, Georgia and her kin hail from both Virginia and NE Georgia. We were married in 1990 in Washington, D.C. She is an Art Therapist. We have two children. Our son Grant graduated from college a year ago and is a Circle of Beloved community member in north Minneapolis. Our daughter Reed currently resides with relatives in SD. Reed is an aspiring singer and painter. Over the past thirty years I have lived, studied and worked on both coasts (DC/NYC/LA) and now reside in the Minneapolis, MN. I was ordained the priesthood in January of 2001. The work I have done since the 80’s has been primarily within the Episcopal Church with emphasis on Indigenous communities. Many of my interests and hobbies relate to my identity as a visual artist. I have a deep interest in exploration of the intersection of Art and Spirituality. In the Spring of 2018 I spent my sabbatical at that intersection. I love to read on topics that range widely and I like to be informed. I write creatively, when the spirit moves me. Music is a great passion for me, leading me to begin learning, in recent years, how to play the electric guitar. I like being outdoors walking whether it be in the city or country. And I’m always up for a new adventure.”

Download the bulletin for Sunday, September 27.
Listen to the Prelude and Postlude.

Join us through Zoom:
To listen in call 312.626.6799. Enter the Meeting ID and #. Enter the Password and #.

To join through the Zoom app:
8:00 a.m. Meeting ID: 590 789 527 Password: 006925
10:00 a.m. Meeting ID: 937 817 763 Password: 031899

OR Watch on Facebook live (even if you are not signed up for Facebook) on our public page.

Why change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Learn about the current movement to change the celebration of Columbus Day to a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Thank you to all who attended our conversation. We discussed this press release calling for the change.

Other suggested reading:
An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

This document will give you background and perspective from the American Indian Center.

Columbus and the Quest for Jerusalem: How Religion Drove the Voyages that Led to America by Carol Delaney

Learn a Native language!

A great back-to-school project for kids and teens (and it’s not all online!)

A Potawatomi Language lesson. Click to hear the first lesson.

Please help us honor the true native languages of this land by learning and sharing nature words of local Native American Chicagoans. Here’s how!

  1. Watch this short video about why language preservation is important: https://theways.org/story/living-language
  2. Visit the St. John’s garden (next to 3857 N Kostner Ave). Write down the words for the things you see that you want to learn the names of i.e. dirt, grass, rabbit, tree, robin, flower, worm etc.
  3. Choose a language you wish to learn. We recommend the starred * languages because you can look up the word and hear how it is pronounced. You may want to choose a language that is your own heritage or a neighbor’s. For instance, the Ho-Chunk nation has an office near St. John’s on Milwaukee Avenue. Here is a list of the 15 largest groups of Native American people living in the Chicagoland area:
LanguageLinkColor of ribbon
* Potawatomi  https://potawatomidictionary.com/Dictionarywhite
Odawa/Ottawahttps://dictionary.nishnaabemwin.atlas-ling.ca/#/help  dark yellow
Ho Chunkhttps://glosbe.com/en/win  light green
Menominee  http://www.menomineelanguage.com/dictionaries-word-listspink
Oneida  https://www.uwgb.edu/dictionary/EnglishToOneida.aspxlight brown
Blackfoot  https://dictionary.blackfoot.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpmedium blue
* Ojibwe  https://ojibwe.lib.umn.edu/browse/englishlight yellow
Cree  https://dictionary.plainscree.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpgrey
Lakota  https://lakhota.org/teach-lakota/classroom-materials/dictionary/red
Dakota  https://glosbe.com/en/daklight blue
Navajo  https://glosbe.com/en/nvtan
Choctaw  https://glosbe.com/en/cholight purple
Cherokee  https://www.manataka.org/page122.htmlorange
Choose your own!http://www.native-languages.org/
Slide to see ribbon color assignments
  1. Write the Native word you learned in permanent marker on the colored ribbon indicated. If the word is something that moves (like a rabbit), tie the ribbon to a picture of it (which you draw or photograph or print). If you are a St. John’s member there is roll of ribbon in your Sunday School in a bag. If you need ribbon please email parishoffice@stjohnschicago.com and we will deliver some to you!
  2. Go back to the garden and tie the ribbon to the thing (tree, flower, wood etc) and bring some sticks to tie on the ribbons and put in the ground (rabbit, butterfly, wind).
  3. Practice saying the words!

Giving to St. John’s

Thank you for thinking about St. John’s during this difficult time. We are planning to continue to pay our employees and our bills so we appreciate all donations. There are four ways to give to St. John’s while we are quarantined.

This fun video shows all the ways you can give to St. John’s! Or read the details below:

  1. You can write a check and mail it to the office: 3857 N Kostner Ave. Chicago, IL 60641. The cost to you is the envelope and the stamp about $.51!
  2. If your bank offers on-line bill payment you can schedule a reoccurring payment. You just need the name and address of the church. If you have a pledge number please add it to the memo line. The bank will generate and send the checks to St. John’s. There is no fee for this.
  3. If you use Zelle or Quick Pay you can schedule a donation to St. John’s by using the email treasurer@stjohnschicago.com There is no fee for this.
  4. You can donate on our website. Click on the red “donate” button at the top of the screen and enter in your debit or credit card number. The fee is 3.95%. For example, if you donate $100 it will charge you $103.95.

If you have questions contact Lisa at parishoffice@stjohnschicago.com or call her at 773.725.9026. Thank you!

Cares and Concerns during a quarantine

Quarantine Self-Care

Music to feed your soul Our Organist, Mio Nakamura, has shared her music on YouTube

Friday Noon Concerts from Fourth Presbyterian Church: You can listen live at 12:10 p.m. or afterwards at: www.bit.ly/fpcprograms.

Face masks are required in stores and outside when 6 feet distances are impossible. Please email parishoffice@stjohnschicago.com if you need a free handmade mask. Or support our parishioner Kate’s sewing business, Masks on Mars, by purchasing one from her on etsy.

Cathedral Counseling Center, a ministry partner of Episcopal Charities and Community Services, continues to provide accessible mental health care to those in need during the COVID-19 pandemic. Services are available via a tele-health platform and sliding scale fees are available. For assistance, please call 312.252.9500, ext. 130 to speak with an intake manager.

Quarantine Care for Others

Groceries purchase and delivery needed for our refugee families. Please email parishoffice@stjohnschicago.com if you would like to be part of a schedule of deliveries.

Please take or leave non-perishable foods from our Little Free Food Pantry which is located in a shed behind the church (enter through the driveway off Byron Street).

St. John’s supports Peace House; so can you! https://www.igrowchicago.org/peace-house/ 

Want to help those who are unable to work or get help at this time? Give to Little Village Mutual Aid: https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/littevillagemutualaid

Support Episcopal Charities During the COVID-19 pandemic, Episcopal Charities’ network of ministry partners is continuing to provide support and services including food, housing, chaplaincy and mental health care. Episcopal Charities has compiled an ongoing list of ways to help support its ministry partners.  Learn more about Episcopal Charities.

Support restaurants and neighbors in need in the Irving Park neighborhood: https://iheartirvingpark.com/

Evening Bible Reflection Group

Our next reflection group meeting is Tuesday, September 8 at 7:30 p.m. Join us on Zoom by copying and pasting this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/99864500270 or opening your Zoom app and putting in the Meeting Id: 998 6450 0270

September 2020: Four Prophets: Joel, Amos, Obediah and Jonah

July and August 2020: The book of Exodus.

May and June 2020: Reflection on the book of Genesis, Part I and Genesis Part II

April 2020: Reflection on the book of Job.

March 2020: Reflection on the book of Esther.

February 2020: Reflection Guide for I Corinthians.

January 2020: Reflection Guide for the Book of the Prophet Isaiah.

November 2019: Reflection Guide for the Gospel of Matthew

Antiracism Team

The Antiracism Team was established in January 2018 and meets monthly. Our Antiracism Action Plan was presented to and accepted by our vestry (leadership council) on June 20, 2018. We worked on our 2019 Antiracism Plan and are continuing our work in 2020. The team began with an African-American Literature Book Group. A list of the books we read over two years can be downloaded here: Reading to End Racism. Our list of books about white supremacy and white privilege is here: Wrestling with White Supremacy. Currently we have a Latinx Book Group and that reading list is on this page of our website.

Click here for all posts connected to our Antiracism work

White Fragility Book Discussion

Thursday, August 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Join us to discuss the book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo, The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. 

Reading this Atlantic Monthly article that gives a critique of the book will help us discuss what Black authors are saying about this book by a White author. 

Here is a link to the reading guide:  https://www.beacon.org/assets/pdfs/whitefragilityreadingguide.pdf
Here are the questions we will discuss.

Join us on Thursday, August 20 at 7:30 pm via Zoom:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82264014704  Meeting ID: 822 6401 4704
By phone: 312.626.6799 Meeting ID: 998 6450 0270# 

Wrestling with White Supremacy

Book Discussion Thursday, July 30 at 7:30 p.m.

In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo offers a hard hitting but user friendly examination of race in America. She offers a contemporary take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement and more.

All are welcome to join!
We will host this event through Zoom.
You can RSVP to rector@stjohnschicago.com to get the zoom link.

On August 30 we will further our discussion with White Fragility.

A reading list from St. John’s Episcopal Church

  • Waking up White: and Finding Myself in the Story of Race by Debby Irving
  • White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin Diangelo
  • Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson
  • Birth of A White Nation by Jacqueline Battalora
  • Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God by Kelly Brown Douglas
  • So you want to talk about race by Ijeoma Oluo
  • Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
  • The 1619 Project published the New York Times

Thank you for visiting our garden

Chicago is the traditional homelands of the Council of the Three Fires: The Odawa, Ojibwe and Potawatomi Nations. Many other Tribes like the Miami, Ho-Chunk, Menominee, Sac and Fox also called this area home. Located at the intersection of several great waterways, the land naturally became a site of travel and healing for many Tribes. American Indians continue to call this area home and now Chicago is home to the sixth largest Urban American Indian community that still practices their heritage, traditions and care for the land and waterways. Today, Chicago continues to be a place that calls many people from diverse backgrounds to live and gather here. Despite the many changes the city has experienced, both our American Indian and the St. John’s Episcopal Church community see the importance of the land and this place that has always been a city home to many diverse backgrounds and perspectives. 

If you would like to express your appreciation for this sacred ground please make a donation to the COVID response or cultural programming of the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative.

Link to the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative website and donation page.

1) Plan and facilitate a series of events to support justice for Native American and indigenous people

New Ho-Chunk Legislators at swearing in ceremony, Madison, WI

Since the beginning of antiracism work at St John’s we have been especially concerned with our history as a predominately white congregation in northwestern Chicago.  How might have previous generations at St John’s unjustly taken advantage of their privileged status?  We immediately learned that St John’s was gifted with ownership of land that had been forcibly and unjustly taken from indigenous people living in the Chicago area.

Accordingly, we developed a land acknowledgement plaque affirming that the church’s land was previously home to many different Native Americans.  The plague has been installed in the front walkway on Kostner Avenue.  The plaque dedication, however, was not able to happen due to the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Our revised plan is to present a series of virtual events from now through the dedication event some time in 2021.  Some of the possible opportunities which need your leadership and support include the following:

  • Update the St John website to include resources and links about Native American people
  • Support the development of Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Chicago
  • Organize installation of art by a Native American artist or artists in the church garden
  • Plan and facilitate education and cultural events for adults and for children
  • Sponsor one session of Sacred Ground, a film-based dialogue series on race and faith developed by the Episcopal Church.  Session 3 is “Whose Land? Exploring Indigenous History”
  • Develop other ways to include Native American perspectives during our regular worship services
  • Promote, participate in, and help fund public events sponsored by Native American organizations
  • Identify and invite indigenous leaders to speak at St John’s
  • With guidance from indigenous people design the plaque dedication event (2021)

To assist with the Sacred Ground events, please contact Andria Anderson at classikal4ll@aol.com