Art and Reflections on Race

Thursday, October 22 from 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. Art and Reflections on Race, an evening to share poetry and reflections on race will feature original poetry by young black poets as well as our own Rich Gage, and a conversation with Joshua Longbrake, artist of the “Confession” sculpture in the garden. The event will be one hour long via Zoom.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81162883439?pwd=WjJzU24xaUFXTjFZcExUNTBYR01NZz09

Meeting ID: 811 6288 3439
Passcode: 3857

By phone: 312.626.6799 ID: 811 6288 3439# Passcode: 3857#

500500

Evening Bible Reflection Group

Our next reflection group meeting is Wednesday, November 11 at 7:30 p.m.

Join us on Zoom by copying and pasting this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88163974158?pwd=ZkRhVENrWjRtV3hrMkJQN1JVRjdCUT09 or opening your Zoom app and putting in the Meeting ID: 881 6397 4158 and Passcode: 3857

October/November 2020: Romans

September 2020: Four Prophets: Joel, Amos, Obediah and Jonah

July and August 2020: The book of Exodus.

May and June 2020: Reflection on the book of Genesis, Part I and Genesis Part II

April 2020: Reflection on the book of Job.

March 2020: Reflection on the book of Esther.

February 2020: Reflection Guide for I Corinthians.

January 2020: Reflection Guide for the Book of the Prophet Isaiah.

November 2019: Reflection Guide for the Gospel of Matthew

Why change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Learn about the current movement to change the celebration of Columbus Day to a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Thank you to all who attended our conversation. We discussed this press release calling for the change.

Other suggested reading:
An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

This document will give you background and perspective from the American Indian Center.

Columbus and the Quest for Jerusalem: How Religion Drove the Voyages that Led to America by Carol Delaney

Learn a Native language!

A great back-to-school project for kids and teens (and it’s not all online!)

A Potawatomi Language lesson. Click to hear the first lesson.

Please help us honor the true native languages of this land by learning and sharing nature words of local Native American Chicagoans. Here’s how!

  1. Watch this short video about why language preservation is important: https://theways.org/story/living-language
  2. Visit the St. John’s garden (next to 3857 N Kostner Ave). Write down the words for the things you see that you want to learn the names of i.e. dirt, grass, rabbit, tree, robin, flower, worm etc.
  3. Choose a language you wish to learn. We recommend the starred * languages because you can look up the word and hear how it is pronounced. You may want to choose a language that is your own heritage or a neighbor’s. For instance, the Ho-Chunk nation has an office near St. John’s on Milwaukee Avenue. Here is a list of the 15 largest groups of Native American people living in the Chicagoland area:
LanguageLinkColor of ribbon
* Potawatomi  https://potawatomidictionary.com/Dictionarywhite
Odawa/Ottawahttps://dictionary.nishnaabemwin.atlas-ling.ca/#/help  dark yellow
Ho Chunkhttps://glosbe.com/en/win  light green
Menominee  http://www.menomineelanguage.com/dictionaries-word-listspink
Oneida  https://www.uwgb.edu/dictionary/EnglishToOneida.aspxlight brown
Blackfoot  https://dictionary.blackfoot.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpmedium blue
* Ojibwe  https://ojibwe.lib.umn.edu/browse/englishlight yellow
Cree  https://dictionary.plainscree.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpgrey
Lakota  https://lakhota.org/teach-lakota/classroom-materials/dictionary/red
Dakota  https://glosbe.com/en/daklight blue
Navajo  https://glosbe.com/en/nvtan
Choctaw  https://glosbe.com/en/cholight purple
Cherokee  https://www.manataka.org/page122.htmlorange
Choose your own!http://www.native-languages.org/
Slide to see ribbon color assignments
  1. Write the Native word you learned in permanent marker on the colored ribbon indicated. If the word is something that moves (like a rabbit), tie the ribbon to a picture of it (which you draw or photograph or print). If you are a St. John’s member there is roll of ribbon in your Sunday School in a bag. If you need ribbon please email parishoffice@stjohnschicago.com and we will deliver some to you!
  2. Go back to the garden and tie the ribbon to the thing (tree, flower, wood etc) and bring some sticks to tie on the ribbons and put in the ground (rabbit, butterfly, wind).
  3. Practice saying the words!

White Fragility Book Discussion

Thursday, August 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Join us to discuss the book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo, The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. 

Reading this Atlantic Monthly article that gives a critique of the book will help us discuss what Black authors are saying about this book by a White author. 

Here is a link to the reading guide:  https://www.beacon.org/assets/pdfs/whitefragilityreadingguide.pdf
Here are the questions we will discuss.

Join us on Thursday, August 20 at 7:30 pm via Zoom:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82264014704  Meeting ID: 822 6401 4704
By phone: 312.626.6799 Meeting ID: 998 6450 0270# 

Wrestling with White Supremacy

Book Discussion Thursday, July 30 at 7:30 p.m.

In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo offers a hard hitting but user friendly examination of race in America. She offers a contemporary take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement and more.

All are welcome to join!
We will host this event through Zoom.
You can RSVP to rector@stjohnschicago.com to get the zoom link.

On August 30 we will further our discussion with White Fragility.

A reading list from St. John’s Episcopal Church

  • Waking up White: and Finding Myself in the Story of Race by Debby Irving
  • White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin Diangelo
  • Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson
  • Birth of A White Nation by Jacqueline Battalora
  • Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God by Kelly Brown Douglas
  • So you want to talk about race by Ijeoma Oluo
  • Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
  • The 1619 Project published the New York Times

Thank you for visiting our garden

Chicago is the traditional homelands of the Council of the Three Fires: The Odawa, Ojibwe and Potawatomi Nations. Many other Tribes like the Miami, Ho-Chunk, Menominee, Sac and Fox also called this area home. Located at the intersection of several great waterways, the land naturally became a site of travel and healing for many Tribes. American Indians continue to call this area home and now Chicago is home to the sixth largest Urban American Indian community that still practices their heritage, traditions and care for the land and waterways. Today, Chicago continues to be a place that calls many people from diverse backgrounds to live and gather here. Despite the many changes the city has experienced, both our American Indian and the St. John’s Episcopal Church community see the importance of the land and this place that has always been a city home to many diverse backgrounds and perspectives. 

If you would like to express your appreciation for this sacred ground please make a donation to the COVID response or cultural programming of the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative.

Link to the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative website and donation page.