St. John’s Lessons and Carols

St. John’s Christmas Lessons and Carols
Tuesday, December 8 at 7:00 p.m.

Join us by copying and pasting this Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87475137051?pwd=Wkw3a0t5UlFDMDdHZ1puZS91cENpZz09

or by phone: 312.626.6799 
Meeting ID: 874 7513 7051  Passcode: 3857

or watch on Facebook (even if you are not on Facebook) https://www.facebook.com/stjohnschicago/

Thanksgiving Prayer

Thank you God for all the gifts you have so freely bestowed upon us, for the beauty and wonder of your creation, in earth and sky and sea.  

Thank you for the Indigenous peoples of this land, the Council of Three Fires, the Ojibwe, Potawatomi, and Odawa who welcomed the Ho-Chunk, Fox, Sauk, Miami, Kickapoo, and Illinois confederacy tribes and offered assistance to the first Europeans to travel here, and who are our neighbors today. 

Thank you for all people who in their daily lives reveal to us the image of God, for our daily food and drink, our homes and families, and our friends.

Thank you for minds to think, and hearts to love, and hands to serve, for health and strength to work, and leisure to rest and play.

We pray for those who go without today, for the brave and courageous, who are patient in suffering and faithful in adversity.

Thank you for all valiant seekers after truth, liberty, and justice, for those who have died, in all times and places, who are alive in our memories and hearts.

Thank you God for this food, for those who labored to produce it and the hands that have prepared it. May this meal strengthen us this day, and give us hope and health in the days ahead. Amen.

Adapted from The Book of Common Prayer, page 837

Art and Reflections on Race

Thursday, October 22 from 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. Art and Reflections on Race, an evening to share poetry and reflections on race will feature original poetry by young black poets as well as our own Rich Gage, and a conversation with Joshua Longbrake, artist of the “Confession” sculpture in the garden. The event will be one hour long via Zoom.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81162883439?pwd=WjJzU24xaUFXTjFZcExUNTBYR01NZz09

Meeting ID: 811 6288 3439
Passcode: 3857

By phone: 312.626.6799 ID: 811 6288 3439# Passcode: 3857#

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Why change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day?

Learn about the current movement to change the celebration of Columbus Day to a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Thank you to all who attended our conversation. We discussed this press release calling for the change.

Other suggested reading:
An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

This document will give you background and perspective from the American Indian Center.

Columbus and the Quest for Jerusalem: How Religion Drove the Voyages that Led to America by Carol Delaney

Learn a Native language!

A great back-to-school project for kids and teens (and it’s not all online!)

A Potawatomi Language lesson. Click to hear the first lesson.

Please help us honor the true native languages of this land by learning and sharing nature words of local Native American Chicagoans. Here’s how!

  1. Watch this short video about why language preservation is important: https://theways.org/story/living-language
  2. Visit the St. John’s garden (next to 3857 N Kostner Ave). Write down the words for the things you see that you want to learn the names of i.e. dirt, grass, rabbit, tree, robin, flower, worm etc.
  3. Choose a language you wish to learn. We recommend the starred * languages because you can look up the word and hear how it is pronounced. You may want to choose a language that is your own heritage or a neighbor’s. For instance, the Ho-Chunk nation has an office near St. John’s on Milwaukee Avenue. Here is a list of the 15 largest groups of Native American people living in the Chicagoland area:
LanguageLinkColor of ribbon
* Potawatomi  https://potawatomidictionary.com/Dictionarywhite
Odawa/Ottawahttps://dictionary.nishnaabemwin.atlas-ling.ca/#/help  dark yellow
Ho Chunkhttps://glosbe.com/en/win  light green
Menominee  http://www.menomineelanguage.com/dictionaries-word-listspink
Oneida  https://www.uwgb.edu/dictionary/EnglishToOneida.aspxlight brown
Blackfoot  https://dictionary.blackfoot.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpmedium blue
* Ojibwe  https://ojibwe.lib.umn.edu/browse/englishlight yellow
Cree  https://dictionary.plainscree.atlas-ling.ca/#/helpgrey
Lakota  https://lakhota.org/teach-lakota/classroom-materials/dictionary/red
Dakota  https://glosbe.com/en/daklight blue
Navajo  https://glosbe.com/en/nvtan
Choctaw  https://glosbe.com/en/cholight purple
Cherokee  https://www.manataka.org/page122.htmlorange
Choose your own!http://www.native-languages.org/
Slide to see ribbon color assignments
  1. Write the Native word you learned in permanent marker on the colored ribbon indicated. If the word is something that moves (like a rabbit), tie the ribbon to a picture of it (which you draw or photograph or print). If you are a St. John’s member there is roll of ribbon in your Sunday School in a bag. If you need ribbon please email parishoffice@stjohnschicago.com and we will deliver some to you!
  2. Go back to the garden and tie the ribbon to the thing (tree, flower, wood etc) and bring some sticks to tie on the ribbons and put in the ground (rabbit, butterfly, wind).
  3. Practice saying the words!

Thank you for visiting our garden

Chicago is the traditional homelands of the Council of the Three Fires: The Odawa, Ojibwe and Potawatomi Nations. Many other Tribes like the Miami, Ho-Chunk, Menominee, Sac and Fox also called this area home. Located at the intersection of several great waterways, the land naturally became a site of travel and healing for many Tribes. American Indians continue to call this area home and now Chicago is home to the sixth largest Urban American Indian community that still practices their heritage, traditions and care for the land and waterways. Today, Chicago continues to be a place that calls many people from diverse backgrounds to live and gather here. Despite the many changes the city has experienced, both our American Indian and the St. John’s Episcopal Church community see the importance of the land and this place that has always been a city home to many diverse backgrounds and perspectives. 

If you would like to express your appreciation for this sacred ground please make a donation to the COVID response or cultural programming of the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative.

Link to the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative website and donation page.