Take your Place at the Table

A Capital Campaign for St. John’s Episcopal Church


We invite you to join us in extending the welcome and hospitality of St. John’s to an ever-widening community.

Phase One Goal $176,000

Accessibility from street level to the Sanctuary and Parish Hall
Church Garden Restoration and New Memorial Garden

10% of all gifts to the Capital Campaign goes to our endowment for the use of future generations.

Phase Two Goal $143,000

Accessible Bathrooms
Kitchen Renovation
Office Reconfiguration

Phase Three Goal $56,000

Restoration of Stained-Glass Windows

To give to the Capital Campaign please use the DONATE button and use the memo line to designate your gift to the Capital Campaign.

Solemnidad de la Virgen de Guadalupe/Celebrate the Feast of the Virgin of Guadalupe

December 12, 2015
5:00 pm

la Virgen de GuadalupeSolemnidad de la Virgen de Guadalupe

Celebra la Fiesta Religiosa de la Virgen de Guadalupe en nuestro primer servicio en español el sábado, 12 de diciembre a las 5:00 de la tarde. ¡Bienvenido a todos! Después del servicio tendremos una  comida a la canasta con tema Latina. Traiga su plato de comida favorito de cualquier país hispano, por favor.

Celebrate the Feast of the Virgin of Guadalupe on Saturday, December 12 at 5:00 p.m. with our first worship service in Spanish. Everyone is welcome to attend. Following the service we will have a Latin-themed potluck. Please bring your favorite dish from any Spanish speaking country.


Conversation on Race

Please join us for an important

Conversation on Race

Tuesday, October 20 at 7:30 p.m.

What can we do in response to the racial violence in our country? We can begin with a conversation and make plans for action. Derrick Dawson, member of St. Martin’s Episcopal Church and our diocesan Anti-Racism Commission, and The Rev. Kara Wagner Sherer will lead a cultural competency conversation. You can prepare by reading this article The Case for Reparations.

derrick dawson Kara3

We are open for prayer today

Reflection on the killing at Emanuel AME Church

It was hard to wake up to the news of the church shooting in Charleston this morning. One more notch on the list of dangerous things to do when black. It is tempting to give in to the belief that good has departed from the world, that nothing we do changes anything, that sin has won. I was reminded today that we can’t think or plan or research or analyze our way out of sin. We must act, commit acts of love, speak words of justice, live lives that change the world.

Today I also received the news that a new baby came into this world last night, June 17 at 9:11 p.m. We have been keeping his parents in our prayers in these last months of anticipation and hope, and now he is here! We rejoice with his parents in this gift. He is a beloved child of God, who will bring belovedness into our world. We know this because of the faith of his parents and the hope of our Christian community.

Sin and blessings are the realities of our world, and we believe in a God who promises that blessings will outweigh and outmaneuver sin and evil. We believe this even when we walk through the valleys of the shadow of death. In times of great joy we remember our call to act for, create, and claim those blessings, not just for ourselves, but for every human being, every living creature, and the earth itself. I am thankful for your witness to this promise and this work, and for baby Longbrake, another player on Team Love.

I offer two reflections for you, the first from scripture, the second from Bishop Lee, as he prepares for the General Convention and his witness as part of Bishops United Against Gun Violence.

May God Bless and keep you, now and always,

Kara +

Wisdom 1:13-15; 2:23-24

God did not make death,

And he does not delight in the death of the living.

For he created all things so that they might exist;

the generative forces of the world are wholesome,

and there is no destructive poison in them,

and the dominion of Hades is not on earth.

For righteousness is immortal.


God created us for incorruption,

and made us in the image of his own eternity,

but through the devil’s envy death entered the world,

and those who belong to his company experience it.


Claiming Common Ground Against Gun Violence: An Invitation from Bishop Lee
This is a link to Bishop Lee’s letter which was issued on Wednesday, just before the shooting.

Where is God?

broken statue


A Reflection by Joshua Longbrake from his blog.


What must I do to get your attention? To get you to speak up? Do I need to pray multiple times a day in a certain position, bowing on my knees or standing on my head? Do I need to go to a specific location? Or are there actions I need to take? Tell me what to do to get you to speak.

Or maybe I don’t need to do anything except listen and look and wait and see.

I was chatting amongst empty pews with Kara, our priest, and Kate and Jason. I preached yesterday (audio here), asking the question Where is God?and pointing out places where the gospel of John speaks to the same question over and over again with audacity and creativity. The question is personal, one I’ve been churning out daily during Lent.

While the four of us were talking after the service there was a sudden roar like thunder from the sacristy (a little room off to the side of the sanctuary). At first I thought the innards of the large organ had collapsed, giant pipes that are built into the wall and which continue through the walls and into a back corner of sacristy. We ran up the center aisle, passed the altar and into that tiny room to see both what had happened and to make sure no one was hurt.

Shelves had collapsed under the weight of what look like giant candlestick holders as large as my arm and made out of thick brass. They had fallen onto a glass table that subsequently shattered. On one of the shelves was also a statue of the virgin Mary holding a baby Jesus.

Kate said, “You asked the question, ‘Where is God?’ and now you’ve found him in the form of this broken baby Jesus. You should probably take him and Mary home.” Kara laughed and nodded and I wondered about signs and the idea of God’s playfulness and the possibility of me making meaning out of events that could be simply chance — but I like to believe the former.

– Joshua Longbrake 9 Mar 2015